Friday, August 10, 2018

DIGITAL DIRECTIONS: Fundamentals of Creating and Managing Digital Collections, Oct. 2018

As received in email.


Join us in Atlanta in October          
DIGITAL DIRECTIONS:    
Fundamentals of Creating and Managing Digital Collections   
October 15-16, 2018 

Venue: The Commerce Club, 191 Peachtree NE, Atlanta, GA

Join colleagues for two full days of instruction on best practices and practical strategies for the creation, curation, and use of digital collections.  The Digital Directions conference is geared toward professionals working with digital collections at archives, libraries, museums, historical organizations, tribal organizations, government agencies, business and special libraries and archives, and other organizations that steward digital collections.

Just getting started with digitization? Or trying to bring several digital projects together into a cohesive digital preservation program?  Digital Directions provides a comprehensive overview as well as a refresher on current standards and best practices. Participants have often commented that meeting colleagues who share similar challenges and interacting one-on-one with conference faculty are among the most valuable aspects of the program.  Seats for the optional discussion lunch with faculty members on Day 2 are going fast!



LEARN MORE AND REGISTER: http://bit.ly/DD18About  

Wednesday, August 08, 2018

Building a Team

Innovation Studio rulesThis fall, I am embarking on research related to public libraries and am building a small (for now) research team (The iSchool Public Libraries Initiative). Often teams form quickly with no forethought in regards to team building and creating the best environment for thriving.  This team is still in its forming stages and I know it would be good to provide some foundation for it. Part of that foundation needs to be understanding what is important to each one of us and how we each normally work.  Rarely do we discuss our normal work habits or what habits we expect from others. And rarely do we share those tips or thought processes that led to our habits, or what we wish our habits were.

This blog post is my attempt to list those things that influence me, in terms of getting work done and interacting with others. Do I do all of these things perfectly?  No.  Do I do them all the time?  No.  But I aspire.  As my team comes together, I hope they will share what influences their work habits with me.  Just talking about it, I'm sure, will make us work better together.

By the way, I have slowly worked on this post for a couple of months as I have remembered, found, and pulled together resources.  I suspect that it still isn't complete.  If you were me, what would you add?  Please leave that information in a comment. Thanks!

 

Productivity

 

Personal Interactions

 

 Team Building

Monday, August 06, 2018

Updated! August - November 2018: Jill's Presentation and Travel Schedule

Breakfast of eggs, salmon and fruitThis is an updated list of my activities from August through November.  If you see something that interests you, please follow the link for more information.

 

Webinars

  • Sept. 4 & 5, 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. ET - Understanding and Defending Copyright in Your Library: An Introduction Workshop for ALA Editions.  This is a two-part webinar.  Additional information, including learning outcomes, is available on the ALA Editions website.
    Series Description: As a librarian, you are a defender of copyright and of proper and ethical access to information. In this two-part workshop, you’ll learn all about copyright, so you can help discern how your library and community can use print and digital materials within the confines of copyright law.
    Part 1: In the first 90-minute session, learn the basic rules of copyright law in ordinary terms and how to put its usage into context.
    Part 2: In part two, we’ll build upon part one and tackle two important areas crucial to libraries: Fair Use and e-books. Did you know there’s an actual test to determine if the use is fair? You’ll learn about that test and how e-books and other digital materials intersect with U.S. copyright law. Given that digital works are generally licensed and not sold, we’ll also look at how we can advocate on behalf of our libraries and community members.
  • Sept. 18, 10:30 - 11:30am ET - Assuring Library Materials Can Be Used by Your Community for PCI Webinars.
    Having materials in a library’s collection is good; having those materials in the formats needed by the library’s community is much better. The act of supplying content in the formats that community members require is critically important to meeting their information needs.
    This informative webinar will delve into ways of discerning the format needs of a community, including using the census and other data, along with existing reports, to discern the best way of provisioning material for the community.
  • Oct. 23, 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. ET - Moving Your Services into Your Community for PCI Webinars. (Registration is not yet open.)
    We’ve heard the refrains of eliminating the reference desk, embedded librarians, and the like. We also hear of the need to get out into our communities. Yet meeting our community members where they are – not where we are – is still a challenge. If we are free to move about our communities, and deliver services outside of the library, what might that look like? What innovative or imaginative twist can we use, which will spark the community’s attention and interaction? How can we assure that our efforts are accomplished in both safe and respectful ways?

 

Courses at Syracuse University

At Syracuse University, I will be teaching the following courses.  If space is available, non-matriculated students can enroll in them.
  • Management Principles for Information Professionals (IST 614) - Aug. 27 - Dec. 7 (on campus, graduate course)
    Basic ideas, concepts and perspectives of management as they apply to the information professions. Students learn to understand and apply basic principles of organization theory and behavior and managerial techniques needed to improve organizational effectiveness.
  • Copyright for Information Professionals (IST 735) - Aug. 27 - Dec. 7 (online - asynchronous, graduate course)
    Geared for library and information professionals, this course provides a firm foundation in the fundamental rules of American copyright law, and equips them with the tools to make informed decisions about copyright issues.
  •  Collection Development & Access (IST 635) - Sept. 28 - Dec. 19 (online - asynchronous and synchronous, graduate course)
    Advanced investigation of collection building, acquisition, and maintenance in libraries and information centers; user and collection analysis, collection development policies, digital resource acquisition and licensing, consortium collaboration, and ethical issues.
  • Syracuse Reads Program - Late September for five weeks (on-campus, freshmen, not open to others)[updated 11:10 a.m.]
  • This is part of an expanded first year experience for all incoming freshmen.  As part of this, all freshmen are reading and will be discussing Trevor Noah's book Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. This is a wonderful book, that is about a mother and son, race, identity, poverty, and more.  I'm thrilled to be one of the substitute discussion facilitators. 
Cafe au lait and Beignets at Cafe du Monde
Coffee and Beignets

 

Travel

In September, I will be representing the SU iSchool at the Joint Council of Librarians of Color Conference, Sept. 26-28, in Albuquerque, NM. Look for me at the Exhibit Hall at the SU booth. If you're at the conference, I hope you'll stop by.

I'll be attending the New York Library Association (NYLA) Annual Conference, Nov. 7-10, in Rochester, NY. I'm very excited about the location, which is relatively close to Syracuse.  Also the keynote speakers - a social worker who works in a library and someone who links patrons with community resources - seem very timely.  If you will be at the NYLA conference, let's find time for a cup of coffee.

 

The Great New York State Fair

Rooster at NYS FairEvery year, the Central New York Library Resources Council coordinates library workers to staff the New York State library booth at the New York State Fair in the Science and Industry Building.  This is fun, hot, tiring, and a great way to interact with people who are (or should be) using their local libraries.  Coming to the Fair? Stop by and talk to whomever is working.  (I'll be there on Aug. 23 in the afternoon.)

Monday, July 30, 2018

Book: Sustainable Thinking: Ensuring Your Library's Future in an Uncertain World

https://www.amazon.com/Sustainable-Thinking-Ensuring-Librarys-Uncertain/dp/0838916880/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1532888306&sr=8-1&keywords=Sustainable+Thinking:+Ensuring+Your+Library's+Future+in+an+Uncertain+World&linkCode=ll1&tag=digitization1-20&linkId=c3a58b75283b2b1c93ebcc8457309084&language=en_USThis year, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich published her book Sustainable Thinking: Ensuring Your Library's Future in an Uncertain WorldSustainable Thinking is part textbook, part workbook, and totally an appeal for libraries to engage their communities as a way to ensure the library's future.

Smith Aldrich draws from her education in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) to develop ideas on how a library can become more sustainable through developing relationships and engaging in more interactions. Rather than giving vague directions, she provides short worksheets at the end of each chapter, which allow library staff and trustees to put the text into meaningful actions in their communities.  This is not a book which a staff member or library trustee should just read; it is a book that should lead to specific actions that will develop resiliency.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs
Smith Aldrich really grabbed my attention on page 18, when she discussed Maslow's hierarchy of needs in comparison with what libraries normally do.  That section - and you'll have to read the book to understand it - is particularly important to me because I know of public libraries that are struggling with providing safe space, and at the same time defending what else they are doing.  (Intrigued?)

Sustainable Thinking is a book which I hope is widely read by library leaders, including trustees.  Even if it doesn't lead immediately to actions, I can imagine the useful conversations it might spark.  Personally, I'm looking forward to giving my copy of the book to the president of the local library board of trustees, and then talking with him about it.

Smith Aldrich holds an MLS degree and the  Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Accreditation for Professionals.  She is also a certified Sustainable Building Advisor (cSBA),  Smith Aldrich is well-known in New York State library circles and is having a huge impact on library-thinking across the U.S.

Rebekkah Smith Aldrich also published Resilience this year.  According to Amazon, "Resilience is the second volume in a new series which focuses on emerging trends in the profession, provoking discussion on how to shape the future by sharing ideas and exploring joint solutions to the challenges facing libraries and society."

FTC Disclaimer: Digitization 101 is an Amazon affiliate and receives a small commission if you purchase a product or service from an Digitization 101 Amazon link.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

CNI Video: Privacy in Cross-Border Preservation-based Partnerships

CNI has released this video from its 2018 spring membership meeting.  Its email announcement said:
In Privacy in Cross-Border Preservation-based Partnerships, Erin Tripp of DuraSpace shares the research and consultation outcomes resulting from the pursuit of an international partnership program to increase adoption of DuraCloud. The initiative prompted questions about information transfer, privacy, and legal jurisdiction.

This video is available through Vimeo and YouTube: