Monday, September 29, 2008

Workshop: Digitizing Audio Collections, Oct. 22 - 24, 2008

Updated October 14, 2008: A commenter (below) has said that the October workshop was canceled and asks if there are any similar workshops around. If anyone knows of possible workshops, please post a comment here. Thank you!

Hopefully workshops like this will become more frequent.


Digitizing Audio Collections

Dates:
  • October 22-24, 2008 -- Metro/Davidson County Archives, Nashville, TN
  • July 22-24, 2009 Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, MO

Cost: $200 American Association for State and Local History members/$265 nonmembers

Over three days you will learn about planning for an audio project and leave with an outline of how to manage an audio project specific for your institution. Day Two will help you build vocabulary, understand how audio is recorded and transferred to digital, and there will be a demonstration of a portable studio set up. On the third day we will step through a new cataloging process that has been specifically created for audio and video collections. Participants will work in teams to create metadata records on site and have resources and examples to take home.

For more information and registration see http://www.aaslh.org/AudioDigitization.htm


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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

This has been canceled. Not sure if the July one is still happening. Any ideas about something like that offered by someone else?

Aaron M. Bittel said...

The only similar workshop I've heard of recently is here:

A Race Against Time: Preserving Our Audiovisual Media

Asking around, nobody here had seen any others advertised lately.

The lack of organized training opportunities for audio preservation has been a real challenge. Several organizations and individuals have been working on changing this, so there may be some new developments coming down the pipe.

On the whole, it seems a little easier to find workshops for planning audio digitization projects (understanding the formats, technologies, signal vs. material degradation, etc.) than to find actual hands-on audio digitization training. Most people still learn those skills in a sort of informal craftsman/apprenticeship system.

Some other training opportunities are listed on the ARSC Education and Training Page and , if you're in Europe, through TAPE (Training for Audiovisual Preservation in Europe).

Yet another way they're ahead of us...